Thursday, 19 December 2019 11:20

The writing’s on the wall

    London’s Wembley Park offers a unique blend of culture, social opportunities and the vibrancy that comes with living in the heart of such a thriving new district. So, when the time came for lifestyle-led rental homes brand Tipi to decorate some of the walls of its newest development – Ferrum – residents knew they would be in for something rather special.

    “We consider every element of life at Tipi with residents firmly in mind, from building design to the range of shops and services in the local area. When it came to the walls within Ferrum, we saw an exciting opportunity to inspire and challenge through art, while also reflecting the urban industrial chic that has been such an influence over the design of these brand-new apartments,” says Jeremy Fletcher, COO at Tipi.

    Perhaps the boldest statement building on the Wembley Park site to date, Ferrum will feature loft-style apartments with a New York-esque feel. Bright solid colour blocks will meet exposed steel and raw timber in these exciting new homes.

    The individual tasked with delighting Tipi residents with his artwork is Japanese Graffiti Artist Suiko. One of Japan’s most celebrated Graffiti Writers, Suiko has a unique style that blends bubbling shapes with dynamic lines and vibrant colour schemes – precisely the vibe that Ferrum will encapsulate.

    As part of his exciting Tipi commission, his first residential project, Suiko has shared some insights into his origins and how his art can enrich the lives of Ferrum’s residents.

    How did you become interested in graffiti, and what inspires your style?

    I discovered graffiti through skateboarding when I was about 16 years old in Japan. I was fascinated by its potential as an expressive art form. To me, graffiti means freedom. My style is inspired by a love of calligraphy and by my home, Hiroshima. It is known in Japan as the City of Seven Rivers, with waterways flowing through the city on their journey down from the mountains to the sea. Hiroshima has the perfect balance in terms of vibrations of humidity, colour...everything really. It is a real influence for my style of graffiti.

    How has your style evolved since you began painting backgrounds?

    I try to keep my style evolving all the time. My original work focused on using curved lines; then I was gradually drawn towards straight lines. And now I’m trying to break my existing style and discover a new flow.

    Why are you drawn to the UK graffiti scene in particular?

    I’ve worked with artists from around the world and have a lot of friends in the UK who share my passion for graffiti. In the past, I’ve done everything from joining a graffiti jam in Brighton with around 100 artists to painting a bar in London. The UK is a great place for collaborating with other artists and for enjoying freedom of expression. London, in particular, has a great street art scene, with artists innovating and going in their own directions to develop new styles.

    What makes Tipi’s Ferrum the ideal canvas for graffiti and your work?

    This was my first residential project, and it was really exciting to have the opportunity to reach over 1000 Tipi residents with my art as part of their daily lives. My painting was dictated by the space and the background and how it felt to me. I don’t preach with my art – it’s there to make people think. It’s natural for people to respond to it in different ways, and I like that freedom of perception. I think it fits well with the Ferrum vibe.

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